War of 1812 Site: Rapelje Farm

Site of American encampment,  November 11, 1814, now Town Hall Tower. 140 Talbot st. St. Thomas
Site of American encampment, November 11, 1814, now Town Hall Tower. 140 Talbot st. St. Thomas

 

On November 11, 1814, McArthur's troops plundered the Rapelje Farm located near here and stayed overnight on the location of the present Town Hall Towers (140 Talbot Street). The losses claim submitted by Daniel Rapelje includes the following:

150 Bushels of wheat - 93 Pounds 15

80 Bushels of corn - 30 Pounds 10

300 Panels (rails) of fence - 22 Pounds

40 Bushels of oats - 10 Pounds

50 Bushels of potatoes - 12 Pounds 10

12 Tons of hay - 42 Pounds

12 Sheep - 18 Pounds

2 Hives of bees – 2 Pounds 10

2 Hogs – 9 Pounds 7

1 Horse – 15 Pounds

Household furniture – 125 Pounds

45 Bushels of wheat destroyed on the ground where the enemy encamped – 16 Pounds 17

A total claim of just over 397 Pounds. The claim is reproduced in Taken and Destroyed: The War of 1812 Losses Claims London and Western Districts Upper Canada by Glenn Stott and Carol Hall.

Captain Daniel Rapelje Plaque, City Hall, St. Thomas
Captain Daniel Rapelje Plaque, City Hall, St. Thomas

Plaque Text:

Emigrating from New York State to the Long Point Settlement in 1802, Rapelje later received 80 ha of land on the south side of the Talbot Road at Kettle Creek. He settled here with his family in 1810. A veteran of Lundy's Lane and other battles of the War of 1812, he became a captain in the 1st Middlesex Militia. In 1814 he built a log grist-mill and subsequently divided a portion of his land into town lots. The settlement that Rapelje established formed the nucleus of the city of St. Thomas.

Pleasent St. Underpass, Near Site of Rapelje Farmhouse, St. Thomas
Pleasent St. Underpass, Near Site of Rapelje Farmhouse, St. Thomas

140 Talbot St., St. Thomas, Ontario